scooters

Learning to Ride Can Be Really F*cking Hard. But It Doesn't Have To Be.

scooter 12.JPG

Learning to ride is something that takes more than a few days/weeks/months. It's 15 years later and I'm *still* learning.

Imagine learning to drive a car for the first time and your mom/dad offers you:

  • Honda Civic 2 Door
  • Chevy Suburban 

Yes, you could theoretically learn on both but which one is going to give you more confidence, self esteem and increase your driving skills? Most of the time when I've thrown a leg over a new bike (either mine or borrowed) I've gone in with some self confidence and some actual riding ability. But riding ability alone isn't enough for me to ride something I've never ridden before. I need the confidence too. I need to feel like I can do it because if I don't, I won't even try. 

I've been getting a lot of questions lately from new riders or potential new ones and I wanted to repeat what I've been telling them here. I know not everyone's experience is the same, but I can guarantee you that learning to crawl before you walk makes a HUGE difference. But ask anyone who started on a small displacement motorcycle or scooter before moving up to a 600cc-1000cc-1500cc option how much they learned. Too much? Not enough? Why or why not? 

Think of learning how to ride this way: 

  • 200-500cc: man, this is a lot easier than I thought. I kick ass. I'm getting the hang of this. 
  • 600-1000cc: shit, this is a lot harder than I thought. I suck at this. I never should've bought a motorcycle.

When my husband took this photo of me back in 2004, we just took our new Ninja 250 for a spin (because that was the *only* small sportbike/naked sporty you could buy in the US) and he basically taught me how to shift up to 2nd and 3rd. I rode around the parking lot a bit to see what it was like. My MSF class was the following month. I never took it on the street, I just did a few laps, nothing special.   

Me in the Presidio Parking Lot, San Francisco. We didn't have iPhones back then, but we did have Motorola flip phones :0

Me in the Presidio Parking Lot, San Francisco. We didn't have iPhones back then, but we did have Motorola flip phones :0

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But before all this motorcycle business, I rode my awesome 50cc 2Stroke Aprilia Scarabeo Scooter. 

I rode her A LOT in my first year of riding (Sept 2003 - Sept 2004). 3,599 miles all in San Francisco to be exact. 

I loved her for the short time I had her. But as soon as I threw a leg over the Ninja (it was his but I needed something to ride so....) I knew it was meant to be. And I figured out how to ride her to work (across San Francisco) in a couple days. 

If you see my pic above on the Ninja, I'm on my toes. Did I care? Nope. Because I was already riding my scooter on my toes. 

2006 Kawasaki Z750S

2006 Kawasaki Z750S

Contrary to popular belief, scooters can be a lot taller than most motorcycles. The Scarabeo had a 30" seat height. But my learning curve was far far less steep than if I forced myself to throw a leg over something like my next bike, the Kawasaki Z750S for the first time (instead of the Ninja). It was taller, heavier, taller and heavier. Did I mention how much heavier it was? Almost 500lbs wet. Ugh.

2003 Suzuki SV650S

2003 Suzuki SV650S

The higher center of gravity on this thing would've been ridiculous. If I had to learn on this or even my SV, I doubt I would've had the skill to move up. 

When I chose that Z750S, it set me back 3 years in my riding development. Everything was suddenly harder: parking, cornering (imagine driving a tall, heavy truck on a twisty road instead of a convertible), uturns. The only thing that was easier was accelerating on the freeway merging into traffic.  

For perspective, this is how much that bike choice affected my riding. This list is in order of when I owned each one and how much I rode them::

  1. Aprilia 50cc Scooter: 3,599 miles in 1 YEAR. woooo hooo! I'm ready to move up. 
  2. Kawasaki Ninja 250: 12,000 miles in 3 years. I learned so much and did a mix of city and highway riding/touring for the first time.
  3. Kawasaki Z750S: a little under 8,000 miles in 3 years. Some city riding, and a couple of long distance rides to LA from San Francisco. But riding the twisties? Forget it. It was annoying, hard, not fun and I was miserable. 
  4. Suzuki SV650S: 6,000 miles in the first 8 MONTHS. YESSSSSS. Where were you all my life? Why didn't I buy you sooner? Ahhh, this is how you corner. That's what it feels like to actually lean. You were so much easier to park and maneuver in San Francisco. And you were WAY MORE FUN to ride. 

Remember, riding is supposed to be FUN! Not stressful, not frustrating and not miserable. When you get off that bike you might be in a little pain from the seat time but you should be HAPPPPPPPY. Ask yourself these questions:

How do you feel when you look at your bike, or think about riding it? How do you feel after? Confident? Excited? 

As soon as I bought the SV, my learning curve flattened and it was so much easier to ride. So much so that I rode it everywhere/everyday/constantly. I learned so much in that first year and felt like it should've been my second motorcycle. This is a photo of the first "curve" I ever took on the SV when my seller delivered it to my house (from 300 miles away, there are still GOOD people left in this world!). It doesn't look like much but just taking this little bend, I felt a huge difference in what I had been missing for the last 3 years. I felt confident, happy, excited, and most of all HAPPY

All I learned on my Z750S was how to manage a taller, heavier bike. But it didn't teach me anything about advanced cornering techniques. Improper cornering is an extremely common factor in solo motorcycle accidents aside from DUI. I firmly believe that It doesn't matter how long you've been riding, it matters how well you can ride. 

Your bike choice will greatly impact how well, how much, how confidently you ride for the next 6-12 months. So make the EASY choice that benefits you in the long run. 

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Because are you planning to ride the same bike for 50 years? Not me..... I'm 3 years in and will probably get itchy in a couple :D

A quick caveat to this post. Learning to ride isn't easy like taking a bite out of a freshly baked chocolate chip cookie. But you can lighten the load a bit and bring down the level of difficulty down from a 10 to a 5. Struggling is definitely part of the experience and you will learn through your mistakes because you have to in order to learn. But when it's so hard that it starts to make you question your ability to ride or the decision to ride in the first place, then it's time to rethink some things. I hope this post does just that, helping you rethink some things. Please post a comment or two below.... 

Motorcycle Etiquette

brammo_empulse As a city girl, I find myself surrounded by a variety of motorcycle / scooter riders. I can honestly say that I've never seen people ride the way they do here. 

I've gotten used to seeing the whole No Helmet, No Gear thing, given PA's lack of a helmet law. But what is really annoying is the lack of motorcycle etiquette (including scooters) that I'm used to experiencing. In addition to general lack of pedestrian and driver safety really. But I suspect that sort of thing is common in most big cities.

Tonight, I was riding home just a few blocks from my house about to pull into a gas station on my right. I'm going maybe 10-15mph and these two bikes pass me on the left inside my lane. I've NEVER had that happen when I rode in San Francisco. Ever. The one time I had someone pass me on the right while out riding my ride leader yelled at him for being such an ass (and doing that to other riders as well, not just me).

The attitudes about motorcycles and scooters here are far less serious and seem whimsical at best. I guess it's a difference in attitudes that are specific to this region. I don't know.

But what I do know is that I'll never be ok with it. And if you're one of those people who like passing your fellow motorcyclists in their lane WITHOUT permission, you're not only risking my life but yours.

What's new from Alpinestars, 2014

alpinestars new land goretex jacket womens motorcycle waterproofalpinestars_new_land_pants_hiviz

Alpinestars just announced it's 2014 collection, which includes quite a few options for women. I just love it when companies release new products for us. Here are my favorite pieces in the collection. Let's start with a couple lightweights and then I'll tell you more about the gorgeous touring outfit above. Everything is slated for September release. For now, you can preorder but most you won't see delivery until sometime in September.

Cassie and Francie Jackets

For the city moto / scooter crowd, these two are fully armored (including back and chest protection), adding another level of protection which your casualwear just doesn't provide. It's difficult to find gear that doesn't look like motorcycle wear, but has some of the protective elements of real gear. Now, these aren't as robust as your typical touring jacket, but for city speeds (think 25-40mph), these will do the job. And typically, when you're a city rider, I would be more worried about the impact injury than abrasion. 

Cassie: $379.95, XS-2XL

  • Advanced poly-fiber and synthetic wool main shell incorporates performance thermal down insulation to offer optimal warmth while being light, bulk-free and without restricting movement.
  • Removable CE certified shoulder and elbow protectors offer class-leading riding protection.
  • Padded chest and back compartments (no one ever offers this feature, except RS Taichi from what I've seen) on jacket allow for Bio Armor chest and back protection accessory upgrade.
  • Easily detachable hood
  • External pockets with snap button and zip closures and internal water-resistant document pocket.
  • Reflective detailing for visibility.
  • Gun metal finishing trim on button and pull chord tabs.
  • Snap connection loops for attachment to Alpinestars riding pants and jeans. 

Francie: $269.95, XS-2XL

  • Diamond rip-stop main shell construction incorporating performance thermal insulation that offers optimal heat while being light, bulk-free and without restricting movement.
  • Removable CE certified shoulder and elbow protectors offer class-leading riding protection.
  • Padded back compartment allows for Bio Armor chest and back protection accessory upgrade.
  • Storm hood comprises elastic edging to secure hood in windy conditions.
  • Adjustable interior gator with snap button connectors forms barrier against wind and helps secure jacket to the body.
  • Convenient exterior pockets with zippers, plus inner mesh pockets and water-resistant inner wallet pocket with easy-locate red zip.
  • Main, frontal zipper, incorporates zip garage (no idea what this means) to help secure zip and avoids skin contact irritation.
  • Elastic cuff edges with thumb grip to secure sleeve in place and help seal out elements.
  • Waist and back shock cord adjustment for highly personalized fit on and off the bike.
  • Brushed fiber collar interior for comfort, plus shock cord adjuster.
  • Reflective detailing for improved garment visibility.
  • Snap-button loops to attach to Alpinestars pants or jeans.

 

Quasar Mesh Jacket

The Quasar appears to be a fully ventilated jacket for summer/spring riding. No removable liners, just lots of ventilation for maximum comfort while riding in hot conditions. I especially like the light gray color option.

$249.95, XS-2XL

  • Constructed with durable and abrasion resistant 600 Denier Polyester Fabric with extended mesh panels on the torso and arms providing substantial airflow when riding for superior comfort in warmer weather conditions.
  • Sport fit with pre-curved sleeves for enhanced riding comfort.
  • CE-certified Bio-Armor elbow and shoulder protectors for added impact protection.
  • Chest and Back protector compartments with advanced poly-foam comfort padding (CE-certified Bio-Armor back protector insert (available as accessory).
  • Internal waist connection zipper allows attachment to selected Alpinestars leather and textile pants.
  • External zipped hand pockets, plus internal pockets and waterproof wallet pocket.
  • Sleeve volume adjusters on biceps and Velcro cuff adjustment for improved fit.
  • Accordion stretch inserts on elbows for improved fit in the riding position.
  • Premium YKK® zippers used throughout the garment.
  • Reflective details for improved nighttime visibility.

 

AST-1 WP Pants

I believe the AST-1 is the updated version of the Stella ST-5 pants. It looks like these have an integrated waterproof membrane (breathable) so they're going to be a better for your spring/fall riding seasons. But if you live in a mild climate like San Francisco, these would work well year round. I especially like the subtle storage pocket on the front thigh. Of course, these have armor at the hips and knees.

$179.95, XS-2XL

  • Specifically constructed for an optimized women’s fit Alpinestars’ Stella AST-1 Waterproof Pants gives the rider peace of mind with a combination of practicality and performance.
  • The pre-curved leg construction and articulated knee design enhance comfort and mobility, while extra protection is afforded by strategically placed ballistic nylon reinforcements. (i.e. Incredible Fit!)
  • Multi-fabric poly-shell construction yields the optimal combination of durability, protection and weight.
  • Protection against the elements provided by an integrated 100% waterproof and breathable membrane.
  • Pre-curved legs and an articulated knee construction enhance freedom of movement while riding.
  • Impact protection provided by removable CE certified knee protectors.
  • Ballistic nylon reinforcements on the thighs, knees and seat area.
  • Integrated high visibility reflective piping enhances rider visibility in poor light conditions.
  • Internal hip compartments are lined with ergonomically tapered PE comfort foam for superior riding comfort.
  • Adjustable waist and secure sliding hook closure for a snug, tailored fit.
  • Extended zippered boot gussets ensure a tight seal around the ankle and facilitate fitting and removal.
  • External flat storage pocket.

 

New Land GTX Jacket and Pants

If you'v read my review of the REV'IT Legacy, you know that these riding outfits are few and far between. Like it's competitor, Dainese, Alpinestars knows how to create a suit that fits like a glove. The addition of GORE-TEX (GTX for short) provides a ton of versatility when it comes to riding year round especially between extreme temperatures. It's one of the best ways to ride between different climates and remain comfortable, warm and dry. Sadly, it also adds to the price point. But in my opinion, wearing GTX is an absolute necessity for year round riding. The materials used for both pieces consist of a Rip-Stop (it won't tear in a vertical direction, but zig/zag to prevent further damage), abrasion resistant TEFLON coated textile to provide maximum protection in major impact zones (shoulders, elbows, knees). The fitment on this outfit looks long and tall. I hope that I'll be able to see samples at some point to give you more details.

Jacket - $599.95, S-2XL

  • Ergonomically optimized and designed for women this jacket incorporates a TEFLON® engineered textile and a GORE-TEX® membrane to provide superb protection against the elements while being light, durable and breathable. Configurable and designed to accompany the Stella New Land GORE-TEX® pants, this jacket gives protection with CE-certified protectors.
  • Superior textile construction featuring GORE-TEX® membrane for protection against elements and breathability.
  • Rip-stop textile, tear-resistant TEFLON® coated shoulder and elbow areas for additional abrasion dissipation in key impact zones.
  • Arm air intakes and rear exhaust zippers, offers greater regulation of internal airflow for enhanced riding comfort for short and long-distances.
  • Removable long-sleeve thermal liner with fleece collar ensures comfort on hot or cold days.
  • Removable CE-certified Bio-Armor on shoulders and elbows is light, breathable and ergonomic for class-leading impact protection.
  • Chest and back pad compartments with advanced thermo-formed protective padding (CE certified Bio Armor back protector insert available as accessory).
  • Additional reinforced external padding zones on the back.
  • Reflective zones and colored piping increase rider visibility in poor or night-time conditions.
  • Neoprene comfort edges on collar and cuffs.
  • Internal waterproof pockets.
  • Elongated rear profiling for comfort and protection in the riding position.
  • Easy-find red internal lining zip and external pull-tabs for convenience.
  • Pre-curved, articulated sleeves with gusseted Velcro cuffs enhance fit and comfort in the riding position.  External storage provided by two chest pockets and two cargo pockets on the front of the jacket.
  • Non-aggressive micro-Velcro® used throughout the garment.
  • Premium YKK zippers with twin sliders on front zipper.
  • Optimized for use with the Stella New Land GORE-TEX® Pant with internal waist connection zipper.

Pants - $469.95, S-XL

  • Alpinestars Stella New Land touring pants incorporate a TEFLON® engineered textile and a GORE-TEX® membrane to provide superb protection against the elements while being light, durable and breathable.
  • Configurable and designed to accompany the Stella New Land GORE-TEX® Jacket, these pants give strategic protection with CE-certified knee protectors.
  • Superior textile construction featuring GORE-TEX® membrane for protection against elements and breathability. Removable long thermal liner with fleece collar ensures comfort on hot or cold days.
  • Strategically placed zippered air intakes and outlets for short and long-distance riding comfort.
  • Rip-stop textile, tear-resistant TEFLON® coated seat and knee areas for additional abrasion performance on key impact zones.
  • Removable CE-certified Bio-Armor on knees is lightweight, breathable and ergonomic for class-leading impact protection.
  • Reflective zones and colored piping increase rider visibility in poor conditions.
  • Easy-find red-tipped external zip pockets.
  • Pre-contoured leg construction with back and knee stretch panels.
  • Adjustable Velcro® waist closure for optimized fit.
  • Zip and Velcro® leg cuff closure fits around various boot models.
  • Optimized for use with the New Land GORE-TEX® Jacket with internal waist connection zipper.

Look for my full review of this outfit in Late October after I get back from Ireland :D

 

Motegi Leather Race Suit

The Motegi features an all new design for the women's line, based on the popular men's version. Personally, I could do with less logos but it's hard to pass up an exquisitely made suit. It may not look like it, but women's Alpinestars suits are proportioned really well for women with curves. This suit is constructed of 1.3mm grain leather, and reinforced Aramid stretch panels where you need them, a ventilated back hump, perforated panels on the front of the chest and legs, and a removable mesh liner (a built in undersuit for moisture wicking breathability).

Size Euro 38-50, $799.95

  • Constructed with premium 1.3mm full-grain leather for unsurpassed abrasion resistance, comfort and durability.
  • Multiple-stitched main seam construction provides maximum tear resistance in the event of an impact.
  • High-density perforations on front panels offer optimum cooling performance.
  • Extended, reinforced Aramidic fiber stretch panels on the sides of the torso, arms, crotch and back of the knees.
  • Alpinestars exclusively profiled ventilated back hump is aerodynamically sculpted for superior air flow and reduced drag at high speeds.
  • Lightweight, contoured mesh calf panels enhance fit and ensure comfort underneath riding boots.
  • Removable, CE certified GP protectors in the elbows and shoulders feature injection molded profiles and dual density foam padding for exceptional protection against impact forces.
  • Alpinestars race-derived, CE approved GP-R knee protectors feature a floating construction for a precise fit in the riding position.
  • TPR reinforcements on the shoulder offer additional abrasion and shock resistance in a key impact area.
  • Integrated PE foam padding on the hips, coccyx, upper arms and sides of the torso further enhance fit and comfort while riding.
  • Snap connection system allows integration with Alpinestars CE level 2 certified Bionic Race Back Protector for the ultimate in protection.
  • Removable mesh liner features built-in stretch inserts to ensure a snug fit and is washable for extra convenience.
  • Premium YKK fasteners used throughout the garment including flat profile YKK® Semi Auto Lock wrist zippers.
  • Replaceable Alpinestars PU Sport kneesliders.
  • Reflective detailing on front and back for improved rider visibility.

alpinestars motegi leather motorcycle suit womens alpinestars motegi leather motorcycle suit womens

 

All items available for Preorder: Revzilla.com

Something we all need to be reminded of.

colorado department of safety motorcycles

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xNouiE7f4uA

The Colorado Department of Safety (CDOT) released this video showing what the potential is for injury when you aren't wearing any gear. CO doesn't have a helmet law in place, which would certainly help. 

I just wish the end comment by the guy in the video included the rest of his body. 

(video seems graphic, but it's fake)

Betty the Brammo, My Love Story

brammo enertia electric motorcycle san francisco

Last summer, I was asked to consider applying for a Brammo Enertia Electric Motorcycle to ride in and around San Francisco. I'd never ridden one and I had no idea what I was in for. Let's just say, it's been one of the greatest two wheel loves of my life. 

Don't get me wrong, I'm still wholly devoted to my Suzuki SV650S. When it comes to touring, hitting the twisties or long weekend rides she's still my girl. 

But, there's something so easy, so fun and so carefree about taking Betty around the city. If you live in a big metropolitan, urban playground then taking a lightweight (324lbs) bike like Betty is a no brainer. Every 5 seconds is another stop sign or traffic light. Average speeds are 25-35mph, maybe 45 on major thoroughfares. 90 degree angles meet you at every turn and traffic backs up within seconds when you least expect it.

Brammo Enertia San Francisco Electric Motorcycles 

I've always ridden in a more forward riding position. My SV definitely has a pretty aggressive one. It's been 9 years since I rode a scooter almost every day, and a fully upright riding position. Between my hip / groin aches from my last accident and my worn out rotator cuff, it feels great to sit up straight with my pegs a little lower than what I'm used to. It's also convinced me that a small street legal dirtbike or supermoto are the best options for riding around the city. It's also fully convinced me that these style of motorcycles are the Best Beginner Bikes! They dramatically increase your self confidence level with their ease of maneuverability, lightweight-ness and familiar riding position. I strongly urge you to consider something with a fully upright riding position as your first bike. Your self confidence will skyrocket and your learning curve will diminish with every corner that you ride ever so perfectly. 

What Ifs

In the beginning I was worried about the usual thoughts that run through one's mind when considering an electric motorcycle or scooter. What about the silence? Won't it be more dangerous? And one of the most difficult issues a motorcyclist may contend with when it comes to a scooter. Fully automatic?! No clutch? No shifting? Won't it be less fun? What about the hills? I live in San Francisco! Well, needless to say, I got over it in a day or two, and I simply don't give a sh*t about the rest because it's IT'S SO DAMN FUN

You don't care that you don't need to pull in your clutch to stop (especially in traffic). I can't tell you how awesome it is to use one hand and barely touch the throttle as I creep through traffic one foot at a time. If you've ever ridden a scooter, you know there's a delay with the throttle and micro managing your speed without putting your feet down can be difficult and annoying through traffic. 

And, with a motorcycle, your clutch hand gets tired pretty quickly trying to manage how far out you can let it go before you need to give it more gas and back and forth and back and forth. It's just one less thing to worry about. It's so freeing to just accelerate and brake, especially with so many stop signs, pedestrians, bicycles and more to think about going from point A to point B. I still think riding a fuel based motorcycle around SF is also the way to go (vs. cars/buses/bicycles) but it's really nice to ride something so light and easy. 

Brammo Enertia Electric Motorcycle San Francisco Scuderia West

And what about these hills anyway? Not a problem. Betty can run up the hills just as easily as my motorcycle. No, not every block in San Francisco is like this one (California @ Powell). Actually, most hills are fairly tame, but even with hills like these, it hasn't changed my ability to ride up and down them as quickly as I please. And if you live in SF, you rarely ride these routes anyway. It's just not my route of choice, even in a car when it comes to going downtown. 

Brammo enertia san francisco electric motorcycle san francisco

I've never struggled going up a hill in my beautiful city. If anything, she's really punchy halfway up. The only hard part is starting off. There is a slight delay but not long enough to matter. Pretty soon I'm almost at the top of the next one to care. Staying ahead of traffic is easy, especially at 30-40 mph. And it's far easier to stop at the top of a really really steep hill like Gough Street between Jackson and Washington.  brammo san francisco electric motorcycle

Since there's no 4 gallon gas tank to balance when coming to a stop, you don't have to worry about braking to hard or leaning forward to counter gravity pulling you backwards. 

I've also never had a bike with such great braking power. The Enertia is equipped with hydraulic front and rear brakes by Brembo. They stop on a dime and I barely have to squeeze the front to give me what I need. I feel like I can stop instantly and with very little effort. 

So what's the downside then?

Well, the one question everyone asks most often is about the range. Is 42 miles enough? Is it really 42? The answers are Yes and No. If you don't live in San Francisco or another large urban city where everything you need is within 50 square miles, then you don't know how close everything is and how much range you really do need. 

I live in a neighborhood where everything I need is within a 4-5 block radius. However, riding to another neighborhood, even across town is within 7 square miles. So realistically speaking, the range is more like 27-28. As we are a hilly city, even cars lose about 10mpg from their listed mileage. Too many hills and too much stopping and starting. It's also a little more fun to open the throttle a bit more than you need to, know what I mean? :)  It also depends on the route I take. If I start my house in the Outer Sunset to the Mission, I could take the fun route with more hills and twisties. But that uses up about 30% of my juice one way. But if I take the commuter, less hilly route I only use 15% one way. So it totally depends on you. 

Brammo Enertia Range Dashboard Digital

As far as recharging, I plug in to recharge as soon as I get home from work for the most part. But I've been experimenting lately with range so I only plug in every couple of days. I still have plenty of juice for another round trip to and from work. But just to make sure I have all the power I need I plug in.

The one thing that does make things easier but does slow down the charge time (4 hours til full) is that you only need a standard 3 prong house outlet to recharge. The cord stashes easily under the seat and as long as you can find a 3 prong outlet (which exists pretty much everywhere),  you can recharge if you run out. 

I take Betty pretty much everywhere I can. I am lucky enough to have a car and motorcycle so if I do need to haul a lot of groceries or supplies I can use one of those if need be. I usually wear a Timbuk2 with me but it would be nice if I could add a top box or tailbag. Unfortunately since it's a one person vehicle there's no rear seat or option to add a tailbag. 

Givi does offer hard side cases which are mounted low, beneath the seat. Certainly adding those would remove the need to wear a messenger bag for storage. The stock seat is pretty comfy but you can add a plush, suede seat for $200  

As of 1/1/3013, all electric motorcycles and cars are subject to a 10% Federal Tax Credit, as well as a CA Tax Rebate (up to $2500). These two incentives make the Brammo a little easier to handle in terms of price. http://www.brammo.com/incentives/

As of 2/1/2013, the 2012 Enertia is on sale at Scuderia for $5400 before rebates. 

Women Rule the Motorcycle World

Jennifer Bromme, Owner at Werkstatt SF

At least in the San Francisco Bay Area anyway :) Did you know that all of these local shops are owned or managed by cool women who ride? Let me know if I missed any...

Brammo Enertia Electric Motorcycle San Francisco Scuderia West

Crystal Gurr, Owner at Scuderia West/SF

 

mission motorcycles daly city

Wendy, Owner at Mission Motorcycles/Daly City

 

Aleks (right), Owner at Moto Shop/South San Francisco 

 

helimot fremont custom leathers

Linda, Owner at Helimot/Fremont 

 

dainese san francisco nicky hayden

Shelli B. (2nd from the right) with Nicky Hayden, Store Manager at Dainese San Francisco

 

We're also lucky to have so many women involved in the motorcycling community in one way or another, such as:

And so many friends of mine who are actively involved in track days, road racing, clubs, organizations and more.

The Bay Area is definitely one of the best places in the world to be a woman and ride a motorcycle. 

 

Motorcycle Gift Idea, Moto Shop Gift Card

  heated grips installation south san francisco bay area moto shop sv650

(There I am installing my sexy Oxford Heated Grips. Ooooooo heat) 

If you've never heard of Moto Shop, go Now! 

Moto Shop is the first do-it-yourself motorcycle shop in South San Francisco, CA. All you need is to ride your motorcycle or scooter into the shop and they will have almost everything you need to fix or spruce up your bike. Stations can be rented hourly, daily or monthly. 

bay area moto shop

Mechanics are also available to help you (but not do the work for you) depending on the nature of your repairs. They also have a ton of classes for you to learn everything from adjusting the sensitive valves on your Ducati to changing your own oil (sooo easy and so cheap to do yourself!)

Pick up a gift card today for your favorite motorcycle or scooter enthusiast. See all the pricing options here