full face

Can't Ride, So I'll Shop. Shoei RF-1200 Photochromic Faceshield.

pinlock_transitions_faceshield Just another faceshield? Something like that. For those of you who wear fancy transition lens glasses, then you know exactly what I'm talking about. 

This Transitions lens is ready for my Shoei RF-1200 and in fact will only fit the RF-1200 since the shields are different on Shoei's other helmet models. It's also Pinlock ready, so that means you can transfer your clear Pinlock insert right into this faceshield (which should've come with your RF-1200, btw. If it didn't you need to call your shop/dealer/website asap).   Once you've done that, you now have a fog free transition lens!

bell_star_carbon_shoei_rf_1200

I haven't worn a dark faceshield on my helmet in over 10 years because I love my Maui Jim sunglasses so much. I'm not sure if this shield will permanently replace using them while riding but I'm hoping that they will. It's such a convenient idea, right?

I'm hoping it doesn't annoy me, and I'm really hoping I don't miss my sunglasses. I am used to having polarized lenses, so we'll see. From my understanding, the Transition lens properties aren't as quick to react as one might think. For example, if you're riding on a twisty road with trees like this:

Rossis Driveway

The lens will not transition instantly back and forth. It can't react that quickly. (If I'm wrong about this, please please post a comment with your own experience). I believe it'll maintain a light smoke color for the duration of the road. I'm also told that when the sky is cloudy or overcast, it also maintains a light smoke tint. I'm a little worried about that because my sunglasses do a phenomenal job of making things easier to see when it's gray out.

It's not cheap at $152.99 (Revzilla), but the technology might be worth paying for if you don't want to change faceshields constantly or carry your fancy sunglasses while you ride.

Fingers crossed, hopefully it'll warm up briefly for me to take Goldie out and test whether or not I'll be keeping this fancy faceshield.

*sigh*

goldie_sunflowers

Sena SMH10R Review

sena_smh10r_shoei_rf1200_graffiti  

Yay! It's review time. I finally upgraded my bluetooth head set to the Sena SMH10R. Oooooooo. Aaaaaaaaah. Ohhhhhh. Read my review here. Did I also mention that I upgraded my helmet to a Shoei RF-1200? :D

Since my Qwest fit me so well, why not go for a lighter, quieter version of it? I'm an XS, and this helmet only weighs 3lbs 5oz! So light. The shell is also really compact, so when I turn my head I don't hit my backpack or my shoulder. It's quieter, less resistant in the wind at high speed, stable and ridiculously comfortable. It comes with a Pinlock faceshield and insert, bonus!

I just picked up this helmet yesterday and have only ridden 10 miles in it so far. I will report back in a month or so. In the meantime, a couple pics of the Graffiti graphic. 

sena_smh10r_shoei_rf1200_graffiti shoei_rf1200_graffiti (2)

 

I found calculus equations underneath the graffiti:

 

shoei_rf1200_graffiti

 

I guess it's fitting since I was an Econ major in college, I did take 2 quarters of Calculus....... :D

 

 

"Quiet" Motorcycle Helmets

Riding down Geary Boulevard in San Francisco back in 2013

Riding down Geary Boulevard in San Francisco back in 2013

I had a really difficult question this week emailed to me from a rider in Australia about which helmets are quieter, full face or modulars? 

Questions:

  • What is the quietest full face flip top (modular)?
  • What is the quietest full face?
  • And are the flip top (modular) as quiet as the full face?

Answer:

Generally speaking, perceived noise levels will vary depending on the individual. Noise can be caused by many factors, including helmet fit; the type of motorcycle and windscreen; wind speed and direction and even the type of clothing that is being worn. Also assuming that you are wearing the correct size/fit for your head, this will also greatly affect perceived noise levels We also always recommend wearing high quality ear plugs to minimize wind noise as well. One of my favorite resources for an exceptionally large selection is Earplug Superstore.

That being said, I am thrilled to share my personal experience with you, as well as that of many of our customers with our most popular helmets for overall noise reduction.

Many will agree that Schuberth makes one of the quietest modulars (also commonly referred to as flip up) starting with their popular C3 Pro.

My old Shoei Qwest Goddess

My old Shoei Qwest Goddess

Schuberth made the first modular helmet and they say that the C3 and C3Pro are the quietest models available. They have wind tunnel tested both of these models starting at “82db at 62 mph on an unfaired motorcycle”. If you search for reviews of these models, you will find many riders agree that the Schuberth helmets are very quiet, relative to other makes/models. I have a C3ProW (women’s specific model of the C3Pro) and can definitely tell a noticeable reduction in wind noise in comparison to the other two helmets I own, which are the Arai Vector-2 and Shoei Qwest. As a side note Shoei claims a 2.2db reduction in overall wind noise from it’s predecessor, the TZ-R. I definitely think my Qwest is quieter than my Vector-2.

Many will also argue that modulars are noisier than full face helmets. That is true with a few exceptions including Schuberth, who has mastered the design and engineering of their helmets to eliminate as much noise as possible. Since Schuberth introduced the C3 a couple years ago, there are more premium modulars that have been released since then to compete including the Shoei Neotec and HJC RPHA Max that also are trying to provide a quieter riding experience. However, if you compare something as premium as the C3Pro to a basic full face helmet at a <$100 price point then the C3Pro is very much quieter than that one.

Alternatively, if you compare the C3Pro to other premium, high end full face street helmets such as the Arai Defiant or Shoei RF-1200 which have both been designed to greatly minimize wind noise, you may find they all come somewhat close to each other. 

The Defiant and RF-1200 have been very popular models among riders who are seeking full face helmets that can greatly reduce wind noise levels. Since Schuberth greatly publicizes their perceived noise level in decibels, I think you can safely assume that the Schuberth models might be a hair quieter than it’s competitors. It’s difficult to say which one is the quietest, but these definitely fall into the ‘more quiet than others’ category.

You must also take into consideration the fairing / windscreen setup of your motorcycle. My bike has nothing, so even the quietest helmets will still be noisy because I have nothing in front of me. Depending on what kind of setup you have on your bike, that will certainly affect overall wind noise as well.

UPDATE 2016: 

Since this post, I've purchased a Shoei RF-1200 which I find to be almost as quiet as my Schuberth. However, I do think the windscreen on my old SV made a difference in reducing noise as well. My current Triumph has nothing! 

New Motorcycle Helmet Line Introduced

Kabuto motorcycle helmets usa ff-5v

Kabuto Helmets USA recently announced that they will be entering the US motorcycle apparel market with models that have been extremely popular in Japan, where the manufacturer is based.

It's always nice to have choices, and these offer additional options in a broad price range between ~$140 and $500. They will also meet or exceed the DOT and Snell Standards.

I wonder what shape/fit they offer. I've yet to see one in person, but based on how the Japanese manufacturer motorcycle apparel, I hope that Kabuto will be another high quality, high value product.

Read more about the 4 models and what they have to offer here, including technical specifications.

Kabuto will be distributed through WPS, Inc.

Passenger on a motorcycle dies from wearing a novelty helmet.

The Press Enterprise - May 7, 2012. "(CHP Says) Woman’s helmet a factor in motorcycle death."

http://www.pe.com/local-news/riverside-county/hemet/hemet-headlines-index/20120507-san-jacinto-woman-killed-in-hwy-79-crash.ece

"I'm just a passenger."

If I hear this statement one more time, I'm going to cry. However, every passenger I've ever spoken to says this exact same thing.

No, you aren't just anything. You are a rider too. It doesn't matter if you're on the backseat. You are up against all the same obstacles as the driver (cars, other riders, deer, etc). Why should your level of safety be any less important?

The next time you hear someone say this, or if you are the one who says it, please think of Suzanne in the story above and GEAR UP. You need a full face helmet, gloves, a jacket, pants and boots too. And no, you don't have to spend a couple thousand dollars on full race leathers. But you do need protective gear that will save your head from serious injury. A jacket, full face helmet, gloves, boots and pants. 

If you were the driver, wouldn't you feel responsible for your passenger's injuries or worse, their death, if you were in an accident?

A passenger's choice to not wear gear is his/her own, yes. But you are the driver and you choose who gets on and who gets off. And that trumps any passenger's choice.