short

Short Riding Tips Series

Me, on my toes at the 2018 Women's Sportbike Rally West

Me, on my toes at the 2018 Women's Sportbike Rally West

After a few weeks of traveling, I'm finally back in Philly. First I went to the Women's Sportbike Rally in Camarillo (July 13-15). That's where I got to ride Goldie's Twin again (above). Isn't she beautiful?

Take a look at the Event Recap Photos to see what you might have missed.  

I've created a new playlist on my Youtube channel which will include my best tips for short riders. Most recently I uploaded a video on how I park my bike. And why most of the time, I choose to jump off my bike to park it and how I do it quickly and safely. I hope you'll subscribe. 

Dainese Custom Suit Experience

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Tuesday, April 24, 2018 — Dainese presents Custom Works, a service for fully-customized and made-to-measure Dainese motorcycle racing suits and jackets for race and street enthusiasts.

The multi-channel experience begins online with the new 3D Configurator and continues at the store where the personalized garment is delivered to the customer. Custom Works is an engaging process that combines the practicality of digital configuration with the craftsmanship of a unique, handmade product.

With Custom Works, Dainese offers all bikers the quality and know-how it has acquired with more than 45 years of experience in the production of personalized leather suits. For nearly half a century, Dainese has grown, collaborated and shared its goals with the greatest riders of all time, from Giacomo Agostini to Valentino Rossi. Over this same period, Dainese has always pushed the boundaries of innovation.

With Custom Works, anyone can have a tailor-made garment and create his or her own unique design, choosing from a vast array of leather colors and accessories, with the option of adding words and images.

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The new Custom Works is a fully updated multi-channel experience. Accessible via the Dainese website, the brand-new 3D configurator allows each motorcyclist to personalize his/her leather suit, jacket or pants in real time, with a simple, engaging and interactive digital experience. The customer can see a preview of the garment, change the colors of the various parts, select accessories (plates, sliders), and upload words and images that are immediately visible on the 3D garment.

Once the design is complete, the biker saves the model and books an appointment during which sizes are taken. The purchase is then completed at a Certified Custom Works Center - a network of stores authorized and certified by Dainese to offer the Custom Works service. 

The 25 anatomical measurements needed for the personalized garment are taken with the support of a specialized consultant. Special consideration is also given to the customer's specific needs and the expected use of the product. At the Store, customers can actually touch the technology, materials, finishes and accessories that give life to the most advanced Grand Prix leather suits and that are also used to create the customized garment. 

With Custom Works, every customer can wear an absolutely unique Dainese garment.

When I clicked on the configurator to see what options were available for women, I found two track suits: 

  1. Laguna Seca 4 $1299 - more aggressive race fit, more stretch panels and tighter overall
  2. Avro - $999, relaxed fit, not a full race cut

If I chose a custom design/color, it was an additional $629. After that, I could pick a custom shoulder slider which is available in fun colors ($47.95) or the flag of your choice for an additional $94.95. These are all costs in addition to the MSRP of $1299.

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Lastly, there's the additional cost for a fully custom size. Just an additional $795. Generally you'll spend anywhere from $1500-$2000 for a great custom suit anyhow. 

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Currently there aren't any separates option for women. But there aren't many for men either, just one jacket (Racing D1) and no pants. 

If you're interested in setting up an appointment, Click Here to visit the configurator and submit a request.  The closest location to Philadelphia is the Dainese New York store. 

Happy Track Day'ng! 

Women's Motorcycle Gear Project

I'm starting a new project and I need some volunteers. I'm starting with a few volunteers to fill out my database so I can put this new website together. I don't have a name yet, but my goal is to help women figure out what might fit them, and how the sizing and fitments will work. 

Size charts only tell you so much, so I'm using real women with real gear (sorry, no casuals on this site for now) to help you shop. On this site you'll find measurements for every woman who submits a photo along with sizing and fit feedback from each person. Hopefully it makes searching for gear easier by also entering your measurement e.g. 41 chest and search results will deliver options for you that might work.  

Katherine in her Rev'it Levante Jacket (40) and Rev'it Tornado Women's Pants (38)

Katherine in her Rev'it Levante Jacket (40) and Rev'it Tornado Women's Pants (38)

So I need your help because I can't possibly be every woman who rides!

Fill out this google form and then email me some photos (instructions provided in the form) 

 

https://goo.gl/forms/4oz8vFgkGajIdfoF3

I might not use your submission depending on what it is. I'm still figuring out how this is going to work and be organized so the more data I have to start with, the better. Only 1 of each item can be submitted right now, so you can submit:

  • One Jacket
  • One Pants
  • One Jacket AND One Pant

I'm shooting for a launch this Summer so if you want to be notified when it launches, sign up for my newsletter.

Email me if you have any questions or post a comment here and I"ll get back to you as soon as I can.

Thank you!!

 

New Boots from Daytona, The Lady Pilot GTX

I've always been a Daytona fan but in recent years I've left my Daytonas behind except for extreme weather conditions like freezing temperatures and heavy wet weather riding. I also have found ways of compensating for lack of height using other methods.

But if you're looking for a way to get additional height without resorting to a casual styled, chunky heel that isn't protective enough, light enough, or strong enough for riding then try these new Lady Pilots from Daytona.  

I'm liking the cleaner calf / leg design and the simplified styling. To me it also seems like there's more height offered through the soles given the wedge-boot style design. I'm going to test this theory out this week and try on my Ladystars and these Lady Pilots to see if I can tell a height difference. Fit wise, these are going to be a wider fitment overall like the Ladystars but we'll see if there's much difference. 

Either way, you save $100 and get the height you might be looking for with a simplified style and the same comfort and quality you'd expect from Daytona. 

Why Motorcycle Seat Heights Are Overrated

Me, in 2014 riding an almost impossibly tall DRZ400SM. ~36" seat height with the knobby tires and me barely compressing the suspension.

Me, in 2014 riding an almost impossibly tall DRZ400SM. ~36" seat height with the knobby tires and me barely compressing the suspension.

So you're shopping for your first sportbike, or you're thinking about upgrading to a taller, heavier, faster bike? What does seat height really mean? Does it matter whether the bike is a V-Twin, L-Twin, Inline-4 or Single Cylinder engine? What exactly am I looking for beyond seat height? Does the suspension matter? These are all questions you should be asking, and you will want to ask to consider whether or not that bike really fits you.

Stop letting seat height be your only determining factor when considering what to ride! 

When you initially look at seat height, say on a 2017 Suzuki SV650A (which is 30.9"), you need to know that this measurement is taken when there isn't a body sitting on it. It's simply obtained by measuring with a tape measure from the ground to the top of the seat. 

2016 Suzuki SV650: Seat Height, WITHOUT YOU ON IT!

2016 Suzuki SV650: Seat Height, WITHOUT YOU ON IT!

But when a person (of adult size and stature of course) sits on this bike, the rider may make the rear shock compress, which can result in an overall reduction in seat height (for me that was ~0.75" when I put in a softer spring on my Triumph). Let's go off on a little tangent here for a second.

When you're a small person like myself (130lbs, 5'2"), there are VERY few 600cc-1,000cc sportbikes/touring bikes that are designed for me to sit on the bike and compress that rear spring (if you aren't doing this, then the bike isn't set up correctly for you). And my Triumph definitely falls into that category. The stock rear shock was really meant for a heavier rider, about 150-160lbs to shmush that spring.

This is what suspension gurus (thanks Ken!) call SAG. For a more in-depth explanation of how this all works, read this

The original rear shock that came with my Triumph before I got a customized Ohlins.

The original rear shock that came with my Triumph before I got a customized Ohlins.

So what did I do to resolve this issue? I married a wonderful man a long time ago who bought me a used Ohlins Racing shock for my 40th birthday that I then had resprung (essentially traded in) with a new spring that was much softer and would compress (sag) under my little weight.

No, that didn't mean I could flat foot my Triumph (and I never will!). But it did mean that when I put my left foot down I didn't have to shift my butt over to the left to get it completely flat. I would say easily, a half inch lower, maybe almost an inch. And having YOUR body sit lower in the seat is far better than having the bike itself lower to the ground (for clearance, especially while LEANING which is the whole point of riding a sportbike! Otherwise, you may want to consider a cruiser because frankly they're just not meant to lean over very far).

If I had gone the lowering route, there's absolutely no way I could lean over on my bike in a corner like this. As you can see, I'm definitely NOT dragging my knee, as I'm not leaning that far over. Bottoming out is a very real risk aside from the performance issues, that come along with lowering your sporty bike. Photo:  Killboy.com   

If I had gone the lowering route, there's absolutely no way I could lean over on my bike in a corner like this. As you can see, I'm definitely NOT dragging my knee, as I'm not leaning that far over. Bottoming out is a very real risk aside from the performance issues, that come along with lowering your sporty bike. Photo: Killboy.com  

So consider the suspension on the bike, on top of the seat height. How stiff is it? Where did the rear shock come from? Was it added on afterwards? Are there any adjustments that can be made now that you are going to ride this bike? If you don't address suspension from the beginning, it can greatly impact your ability to ride the bike, your perception of what you think you can ride and your overall experience. 

If you don't have the funds to customize your suspension, your bike probably has at the minimum, the ability to adjust the Preload. In this handy guide from Sport Rider Magazine, they have a simple definition.  If you lessen the Preload, that can also result in an immediate drop in seat height! When I bought a Kawasaki Z750S about 10 years ago, it felt a tad taller than I was ready for. But my mechanic was able to drop the Preload and bring it down to the lowest point which immediately made me feel much more comfortable. I'd say it lowered me a good 0.5" overall. (Certainly not near flat footing but at least I got the balls of my feet down instead of tip toes, and almost a flat left)

z750s

So assuming that the bike you want has a shock that's set in the range of your weight, and you have the option to adjust the Preload, you've immediately lost a good chunk of seat height. On that SV650A, I'd say you could easily chop off at least a half inch, if not an inch depending on the combination of Preload adjustment and rear shock compression. 

There's also the issue of the bike itself. Now, look at the SV650 and look at my old blue Kawi above. Look at the engine. What's different? Well, first off the Kawi is a 4-cylinder, also known as an Inline-4. That makes for a MUCH wider engine overall than the SV650, which is only a 2-cylinder! And, see how they lay the cylinders at an angle on the Suzuki? That's why it's called a V-Twin. Now you've lost half the thickness of the bike between your legs. What just happened? Your knees are much closer together than on the Kawi. So when you go to put your feet down, they'll also be a bit closer to the ground because there aren't 2 more cylinders in your way. Also notice how the seats on both bikes are tapered as it gets closer to the tank. This is a good thing because again, now your knees are much closer. It's not just height that keeps your feet from reaching the ground.  

2017 sv650A
Specs for the 2017 Suzuki SV650A, from  SuzukiCycles.com

Specs for the 2017 Suzuki SV650A, from SuzukiCycles.com

Another thing to consider that you will (yes you really need to) be wearing proper motorcycle boots. Not sneakers, not flip flops, not loafers. Real riding boots. Something that has a real sole, grippy, anti slip and probably ~1-2" higher in the heel. Leverage is one of our most important friends as shorter riders. Without it you are screwed. (Pssst..Stop trying to ride a motorcycle without the right gear. It's a real motorcycle, not a video game :D)

A very good example of this is the Daytona Ladystar. But you may not even need something that tall.

You may just need a regular riding boot like these Sidi Vertigo Leis, (left) which I wear every time I go riding. And even these have ~3/4" heel on them. So add that to your natural inseam. 

I've also added these awesome insoles which give me another 2" of overall height! HELL YES.

 

Available on  Amazon.com . Just do a search for Height Insoles or Lifted Insoles and you'll find a ton on Google or Amazon. 

Available on Amazon.com. Just do a search for Height Insoles or Lifted Insoles and you'll find a ton on Google or Amazon. 

So all I'm saying is, DON'T GIVE UP just because some numbers tell you that you should! If you've been riding something for awhile and are ready for the next level, then some of these things will greatly apply to what you're thinking about riding. 

Or, as a totally new rider you will also be thinking about what you can or can't ride. So make sure you start AT YOUR EXPERIENCE LEVEL. I can't emphasize this enough. 

I truly think this is the #1 mistake people make (aside from not gearing up). When you start on a bike that is well beyond your level, you have no idea how to compensate for the lack of height. Instead you end up frustrated, stressed out, unhappy and probably someone with very poor riding skills as you drop your bike left and right. 

A couple of caveats however, with all this advice: 

  1. Don't expect to ride a bike with a really tall inseam (~3-6" taller than yours) if you've never ridden before! Because, no, that won't work! 
  2. And there are NO shortcuts to becoming proficient in riding and getting better at riding. When we are short, we must ride better:
    • With more precision than anyone else to ensure we brake perfectly so as to prevent dropping the bike. This means clutch/throttle control, exceptionally smooth braking and cornering, etc. 

Also read this article I wrote about all the bikes I've ridden in my brief career as a motorcyclist. There are a few other things to think about when choosing the right motorcycle as well.  

Good luck, and remember to consider everything when shopping for a motorcycle. Don't let anyone make a decision as personal as choosing YOUR motorcycle or motorcycle gear. 

New Revit Women's Gear for Spring

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If we're lucky, Spring will come early to us in the Northeast. It's definitely been a warm winter, with only one real snowstorm having come through a couple weeks ago. So let's get a jumpstart on Spring with all New Gear from Revit and Dainese! 

Let's start with my favorite brand Revit and a few new Jacket and Pant Combos as well as some great gloves:

Airwave 2

$229.99 Jacket, $209.99 Pants

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The popular 2 piece Airwave suit is back in its second revision. Above is one of the colors, which I really like. You will also find black and 3 other silver combinations for the jacket and finally a silver option for the pants! The last version was only offered in black and all white (why??).  I'm loving all the new color options as well. In addition to the 2 silver combos above, you can also find black, white/black and silver/fuschia. And the best part, Short and Tall Sizing is now available in the pants! The previous version did not have these options. Thank you Revit for making more available to us. Take note, if you're trying to sell women's motorcycle gear to the Masses, then you better step up your game and make everything fit women as well as Revit does.

One major change that I'm not too happy with is that they've removed the full inner zipper from the crotch to the ankle. I think this was a huge mistake but I'm anxious to see how well they fit. They probably have a slimmer fitment since they're not designed as overpants anymore, whereas the previous version fit much looser.

And yes, the price has gone up a little on the jacket and pant, but the pants now include Seesoft Hip Protectors (which are thinner than the Tryonic Hip Protectors offered in their other pants)  along with the Knox protectors at the knees!

Tornado 2

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$339.99 Jacket, $359.99 Pants

Don't worry, you can also get the almighty color black in this outfit as well. Again, Revit has provided us more options by adding short and tall sizes for the pants! Woo hoo. In the pants you're getting better armor than the Airwaves with Seeflex level 2 CE protection at knees and Seesmart CE-level 1 protection at hip. There also appears to be seat grippers on your butt. The overall functionality of the outfit remains the same, with a 2-in-1 thermal and waterproof liner (so one liner that comes out, not two). This makes the outfit much better suited for non humid, wet summer riding. You'll need to wear rain gear over the top so you're not sweltering inside.

I'm hoping they adjusted the fitment along the forearms and made them a bit slimmer in the smaller sizes.

 

Outback 2 Jacket and Enterprise 2 Pants

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Jacket $349.99, Pants $199.99

The Outback and Enterprise has been in Revit's Mens Lineup for a few seasons now, but hasn't been entered into the women's lineup until this season. The Enterprise 2 Pants feature an integrated waterproof membrane, and a functional cargo style pocket on the right thigh. They were smart this time around and added thinner Seeflex Hip Protectors again so as to not increase volume which then adds almost an extra size around the hips. These pants are also offered in black and short and tall sizes!

The Outback 2 jacket has 2 removable liners to give you 3 full seasons, maybe 4 depending how mild your summer and winter seasons are.  I've always felt that Revit does the best job when it comes to pants, they know how we need riding pants to fit. They know exactly how to articulate them so when we put our feet up on the pegs, they don't rise up as much as other pants can. They know how to make them so comfortable when you're riding for 8-10 hours a day you have no idea you're wearing them.

GLOVES

Revit has 5 new women's gloves for Spring. Unfortunately I think they got rid of one glove that was really one of the best gloves in their lineup, the Bomber. It was a fantastic short cuffed summer glove, and offered a lot of protection at that level. That's the only thing that disappoints me slightly about the glove offerings, but there's definitely an alternative in the lineup.

And they're finally offered in XS! Let's start with street and then go to the lighter options.

Summit 2 H2O

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$139.99. The Summit 2's are a follow up to the popular Summit gloves. I thought these were the best street gloves for women, given how versatile they were being waterproof. They were great for fairly year round riding (except extreme heat and cold). The newest version still has the same features that I think made the last versions great; palm sliders, hard knuckle protection and even a pinky protector. They aren't a winter glove (think 50s-60-70s before windchill) and aren't a summer glove (80s-90s+) but work well for those in between temperatures.

 

Chevron 2

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At $119.99, the Chevron 2s are the ideal summer weight, short cuffed glove. I'm personally not a fan of short cuff gloves as I much prefer more wrist protection. However, if you're looking for a shortie, this offers a palm slider (which wasn't offered on the last version) and hard knuckle protection. Two things that are nice to have while riding on the street. Don't worry, it's also offered in black.

 

Monster 2

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$129.99.  The Monster 2's are like a Bomber, but lacking a palm slider and wrist strap. I think Revit is trying to appeal to the hipster / urban / city / fashion crowd by adding quilting and a brown option (black too). Other brands have tried to make stylish gloves that offers some protection but the one thing they lack is the fact that they're not Revit, and Revit knows how to make gloves. I just wish they had a palm slider, given the price point. But if you need that protection then that's what Chevron 2's are for.

 

Fly 2

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$89.99. The Fly 2's are your more affordable summer glove, at a lower price point. Not a lot going on, just a simple leather glove with some hard knuckle protection. No surprises here.

 

Striker 2

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$89.99. The Striker 2's are also new in the women's lineup, for the dual sport / adventure enthusiasts. These lack a hard palm slider for pavement so be careful if you're trying to wear these on the street. Otherwise I like what they have to offer, leather palms and light textile mesh on top with some hard knuckles and a secure wrist strap.

 

Neutron 2

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$79.99. For $10 less than the Striker 2 you'll get softer knuckle armor but otherwise not much different. Leather palms and a light textile mesh on top for summer dual sport / adventure riding.

 

QnA: Finding a Motorcycle to Lower?

2006 Triumph Speed Triple Reader Susan asks me what kind of sportbike should she get in order to lower and learn to ride. 

I am trying to find a bike that is safe to lower... I have a 27 inch inseam... all of the sport bikes are too tall and I dont want a cruiser or rebel.... wanted a ducati 696 but thats too tall and too much power... any suggestions ? - Susan ( love your page too )

Dear Susan,

First, thank you for reading GearChic.com!

A Ducati Monster 696 can be a terrific bike to start on. But it's not for everyone. And it certainly wouldn't have been for me. If you've read about me, then you know I started on a lightweight scooter. No, you don't have to start on a scooter. However, it's MUCH easier to start on something LIGHTER AND TALLER than heavier and taller. My scooter weighed ~250lbs but had a 30" seat height! But it didn't matter since the weight was really low (below my butt) and I could easily pick it up when I dropped it. :D

If the Ducati Monster 696 is the sportbike if your dreams, then I really recommend starting with something smaller and spend the time you need to learn how to ride! Just because you start on something like a Ninja 250 doesn't mean you are going to be married to that bike forever. We can't grow taller, so what can we do? We can hone our riding techniques and skills so balancing a bike with 4-5" of extra seat height doesn't matter!

suzuki drz 400 sm

By the time I started riding a Ninja, it was an easy transition. I was already used to using my left foot first and keeping my right foot on the brakes to keep the bike from falling over. I was already used to something almost 300lbs, so jumping up to ~350lbs was easy.

The other thing to know is that with a 27" inseam, you will probably never flat foot anything if your dream is to ride a taller bike like a Ducati. Also keep in mind that lowering sportbikes means losing ground clearance, meaning when you lean you will be limited to how much you will be able to! Something that you don't understand know, but trust me you will learn to love especially when you ride a sportbike.

A Ninja 250/300 might have a 30" seat height but that doesn't mean you can't ride them. Keep in mind that when you buy a proper pair of motorcycle boots like these you will automatically be 1.5-2" off the ground from the heel to the arches of your feet. You're now close to 29". And when you take your motorcycle safety class, you will learn the proper techniques to brake and use your controls so you don't drop you bike.

2003 Kawasaki Ninja 250

The key to all of this is being willing to learn, grow and make mistakes. It's not easy, it's not quick and it's going to take time. But trust me, when you put the time into a smaller, lightweight bike the payoff is amazing!

But that's what worked for me, and I feel I'm a MUCH better rider because of it. There's absolutely NO WAY I'd be able to ride bikes like these without having invested the time and making mistakes.

Whatever you decide, just know that motorcycling is something you work at, constantly. Even after 12 years, I still struggle every time I ride to do it better and safer each time.

 

QnA: How Do You Handle the Weight of Your Bike?

A woman rider asked me recently about how do handle the weight of her bike as a new rider.  Initially, she had questions about the Daytona Lady Stars, and whether they would help her get both feet down comfortably on a Ninja 250. When I do wear my Daytonas (but not all the time), they only allow me to have both balls of my feet on the ground. So most of the time I use one flat left.

2012_triumph_street_tripleR

"So with the boots, I'm able to put a foot down. How do you handle the weight of the bike? I meant like when you're parking or in situation where you need both feet to roll the bike?" - Mango 

I'm assuming that you can get almost one flat left or a full flat left down. If this is the case, then you will always, always keep your right on the rear brake for stability, no matter what. As long as your right foot is on the brake, your bike won't go anywhere.

Continue to practice braking as perfectly Smooth as you can. Pretend you're entering a contest for the best braking technique and the grand prize is going to be a million dollars. The only way you're going to balance the motorcycle without dropping it is really finessing and perfecting your braking so you don't stop and release too soon or grab all at once.

As far as parking, get off the bike. There's nothing wrong with having to park the bike while walking next to it. In fact, if I never did this I wouldn't be riding my motorcycle today because I can't park unless the pavement is completely flat. If there's even a slight slope I always get off and park. Most of the time I find it faster and a lot easier to manage. When you do park, lean the tank on your hip and walk the bike backwards. I have a blog post here that shows what I mean with a few pictures.

Keep practicing, and try not to think about what others will think or say or do. It's all about You riding your motorcycle, not them.

 

 

QnA: Can a short woman ride sportbikes?

Riding my Husband's 2006 Triumph Speed Triple

Riding my Husband's 2006 Triumph Speed Triple

Reader Farhana emailed me asking if it's ever going to be possible for her to ride a sportbike at 4'11". 

The short answer is YES. Here's her original question and my slightly longer answer :D

I'm currently in the riding course, and needed input from women rider. I am 4'11, and I need input for bikes. I really want a sport bike, but since I have never maneuvered a bike before, everyone is telling me to start on a Rebel. Do you even think it's possible for me to ever ride a sport bike? I appreciate your time.

-Farhana

Dear Farhana,

Everyone is correct!

To ride the SportBikes of your dreams you have to start somewhere. Motorcycling is a constant learning experience and you have to build skills to jump to the next bike! I started on a rebel in my safety course and also started on a scooter. You won't ride a rebel forever, but you'll learn so much so you can ride a SportBike someday.

Never flat foot, even with  fancy Daytonas . 

Never flat foot, even with fancy Daytonas

Me, riding the tallest motorcycle I've ever ridden. A stock DRZ400SM with ~36" seat height. Yikes.

Me, riding the tallest motorcycle I've ever ridden. A stock DRZ400SM with ~36" seat height. Yikes.

I have learned that because I'm shorter, starting out on smaller motorcycles was the only way I could get enough experience to manage bigger, heavier bikes. If you try to attack a larger bike that's beyond your experience level, it's going to be a much harder learning curve. Gaining confidence and learning to ride something smaller and lighter is one of the best ways to adapt quickly to taller bikes. Since we'll never grow taller, all we can do is master our skills and learn to ride better than someone taller.

That being said, since I don't know your inseam, I'm going to assume it's ~26-27"? Personally, I've been able to ride bikes with 2" higher inseams than my own. Mine is 28.5" and I'm very comfortable on 30-31" bikes. There's a chance you won't be able to physically ride anything larger than maybe a bike with a 29" inseam. It's totally dependent on the individual, really. I think if you can get close to flat foot on your left, then there's no reason why you can't ride something. Of course, building enough confidence to ride something that tall without dropping or falling constantly is going to take a while.

And for inspiration, watch this video:

 

Before you start, check out my post about riding motorcycles when you're short. It'll give you some tips to get started.

Good luck!

Extra Extra Small Women's Motorcycle Gloves

Just in time for summer. Dainese has come out with not only 1, but 2 pairs of gloves in 2XS to provide options for women with very very small hands.  Or, if you have a youngster just learning to ride and he/she needs smaller gloves now you have two pairs to choose from!

Neither of these gloves are precurved very much, which for me is a dealbreaker. A glove that has a lot of precurve in the fingers, palms, etc. like these will reduce fatigue while using your hand controls for long periods of time. The last thing I want is for my hand to fit the gloves because they're not fitting me right.

I'm always a fan of more protection than not so I'm going to recommend the Air Hero's ($95) first with the added hard knuckles and slightly increased leather coverage. You never know where your hands are going to end up.

dainese_womens_air_hero_gloves

 

The second pair is much lighter but still has a full leather palm (which is a MUST). The Air Migs are also quite ventilated but are lacking in any hard knuckle protection.

dainese_womens_air_mig_gloves

 

There are multiple colors available and again, are offered in 2XS! Woo hoo.