MIC

19% of Motorcycle OWNERS in the US are WOMEN!

BUT THAT’S NOT ALL WE’RE DOING.

Read my full article over at Common Tread, with a few shoutouts to female entrpreneurs in the motorcycle world that are starting to take over our industry.

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/women-are-now-19-percent-of-us-riders-but-thats-not-all-theyre-doing

Wooo Hooo!

Wooo Hooo!

Of course, ask any woman rider and she’ll likely tell you the same thing.

I know that in the last decade I’ve seen it, felt it and experienced it too!

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Motorcycle Ownership Among Women Climbs to 19 Percent

Nov 29, 2018

Motorcycle Industry Council Survey Reveals Continuing Shift in Rider Demographics

IRVINE, Calif., November 29, 2018 – Nearly one in five motorcycle owners is now female, compared with one in 10 less than a decade ago, and the data suggests that women could soon make up one quarter of owners, which would be a major shift in motorcycling demographics, according to the latest national survey by the Motorcycle Industry Council.

Among all age groups, women now make up 19 percent of motorcycle owners. But the 2018 survey showed even greater female ownership within younger generations. Among Gen X motorcycle owners, 22 percent were women; among Gen Y, 26 percent were women.

“As the number of Boomer and mature motorcyclists shrink and are replaced by newer riders, we could soon be looking at a solid 25 percent of motorcycle owners being female,” said Andria Yu, MIC director of communications. “We’ve seen with our own eyes many more women riders — on the roads, on the trails, on the track, with families, at motorcycling events, forming clubs and just being part of everyday group rides. Many people in the industry have worked some 30 years to achieve this, and now the data confirms it: More and more women are getting out there and enjoying motorcycles.”

The MIC polled 2,472 adults nationwide for the 2018 Motorcycle/ATV Owner Survey. For decades, the MIC surveys have served as the census of motorcycling, and have tracked a steady growth in the percentage of women who own bikes.

“Major efforts to increase the number of women riders go back to the late 1980s when top manufacturers and distributors came together and formed Discover Today’s Motorcycling, the industry outreach program built to introduce new riders to two-wheeling,” said Cam Arnold, a longtime industry executive who is organizing a Women in Powersports networking event this evening in New York City. “The first DTM project in the 1980s spotlighted the historic 1916 Van Buren sisters ride across the country and garnered much media attention. Throughout the 1990s and on till today, the big brands have dedicated increasing amounts of attention to the women’s market, and we’ve simply seen more and more positive imagery on TV, in movies and in many mainstream settings where women on motorcycles are just having fun.”

The 2018 owner survey also found that women motorcycle owners spend, on average, $574 a year on tires, routine repairs, maintenance, replacement parts, and accessories and modifying equipment, compared with $497 by men.

“We’ve seen particularly strong growth in the aftermarket sector for women,” said Cinnamon Kernes, newly appointed vice president and general manager of MIC Events and the American International Motorcycle Expo presented by Nationwide, the largest powersports trade and consumer show in North America. “Over the past decade, more women are designing riding gear and other products specifically for female riders, working in major companies or creating their own brands. Having gear designed for women by women was a huge step and has certainly helped encourage female ridership.”

The Women in Powersports gathering today will be at the Manhattan showroom and factory of Breaking Hearts & Burning Rubber, a company owned and operated by women producing motorcycle gear and apparel for women.

Motorcycling has grown in popularity and acceptance in American culture in recent decades, which is reflected in the survey. It found that 66 percent of women motorcycle owners say their family and friends would have a positive attitude toward motorcycles and scooters.

Additional data on women riders, and all riders, from the MIC’s 2018 Motorcycle/ATV Owner Survey, will be spotlighted and discussed at tonight’s Women in Powersports event and at the Progressive International Motorcycle Show this weekend at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan.

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues, and the American International Motorcycle Expo. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers, distributors, dealers and retailers of motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, ROVs, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts, accessories and related goods and services, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at www.mic.org.

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Record Number of Women Own Motorcycles

philly moto girls revit dainese tourmaster pants jacket leather marryl gear2  

According to the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) more women are not only riding motorcycles today but Owning them as well! 

More Female Riders Than Ever According to Latest Motorcycle Industry Council Owner Survey

IRVINE, Calif. Dec. 16, 2015 –Female motorcycle ownership is at an all-time high, according to the latest data from the Motorcycle Industry Council. The MIC’s latest Motorcycle Owner Survey found that women account for 14 percent of all U.S. motorcycle owners, well up from the 8 percent reported in 1998.

“Women continue to embrace motorcycling like never before,” said Sarah Schilke, national marketing manager of BMW Motorrad USA and chair of PowerLily, a group consisting of female motorcycle industry professionals. “Of the 9.2 million owners, more are women than we’ve ever recorded. And, among the more than 30 million Americans who swung a leg over a motorcycle and rode at least once in 2014, a quarter (25%) of these riders were women (riders aren't all necessarily owners).”

Among younger generations of owners, the percentage of women is even higher. More than 17 percent of Gen X and Gen Y owners are women (I definitely see younger and younger women riding these days). Among Boomer owners, women make up 9 percent.

“It’s encouraging that we’re seeing more women among the riders who are coming up,” Schilke said. “Motorcycling is for everyone, and that’s being recognized by younger generations.”

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The Owner Survey also revealed what type of bikes women prefer. Cruisers are the choice of 34 percent of female riders. Scooters rank a close second at 33 percent, followed by sportbikes at 10 percent (we still have work to do, fellow sporties!).

In the survey of some 48,000 American households, women were asked to share their top three reasons for riding motorcycles. They answered “fun and recreation,” followed by “sense of freedom” and “enjoy outdoors/nature.” When it comes to purchasing a motorcycle, women rate “Fuel Economy” and “Test Rides” as the most important factors.

The study revealed that female riders are safety-conscious (Hell Yeah!). While 60 percent of women took a motorcycle safety course, only 42 of men had any formal training (are boys letting their egos in the way?). In some state motorcycle safety training programs, women make up 30 percent of the student population.

Other key survey results:

  • The median age for female motorcyclists is 39 versus 48 for males
  • More than 49 percent of women motorcyclists perform their own maintenance or have a friend or relative do it, instead of taking their bikes to a shop
  • New bikes are preferred over used by 57 percent of female riders (I guess I'm in the minority, used all the way!) 49 percent of female motorcyclists are married 47 percent of female motorcyclists have a college or post-graduate degree

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The MIC Motorcycle Owner Survey is free to MIC members, but can be purchased by non-members for $12,500. 

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, and activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers, distributors, dealers and retailers of motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, ROVs, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts, accessories and related goods and services, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at mic.org.

Sarah Schilke Joins BMW Motorrad USA

gearchic_sarah_schilke_bmw_motorrad Yes! More Women taking over the motorcycle industry. So excited to see my friend Sarah move into an incredible position with BMW Motorrad USA, one of the most popular brands among women riders. 

IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 4, 2015 – Industry veteran Sarah Schilke has announced she has accepted the position of National Marketing Manager with BMW Motorrad USA, a move that opens up her previously held seat on the MIC Board of Directors. 

Schilke was serving her third term on the MIC BOD. “We will miss Sarah’s leadership and dedication at our meetings,” said MIC Board Chairman Dennis McNeal. “But we know that her input and influence will continue through BMW’s ongoing MIC Board participation.” BMW Motorrad USA is represented on the Board by BMW Vice President Kris Odwarka. 

Schilke’s résumé consists of a wide range of industry marketing experience, including such roles as Marketing and Public Relations Manager for Schuberth North America, Western Advertising Manager for American Motorcyclist Magazine and Marketing Director and Show Feature Manager for Advanstar Communications.

“I congratulate Sarah on her new opportunity, and would like to take this opportunity to thank her for her previous service to the industry,” said MIC President Tim Buche. “The remaining eleven MIC board members are well-poised to continue their ongoing efforts to preserve, protect and promote the motorcycle industry, and we look forward to filling this open seat during MIC's annual election cycle later this year." 

The 2015 MIC Board of Directors includes Arnold W. Ackerman (Motorsport Aftermarket Group), Steve Bortolamedi (Suzuki Motor of America, Inc.), Russ Brenan (Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A.), Jon-Erik Burleson (KTM North America, Inc.), Don Emde (Don Emde Inc.), Robert Gurga (American Honda Motor Co., Inc.), Andrew Leisner (Bonnier Motorcycle Group), Larry Little (Marketplace Events Motorcycle Group), Dennis McNeal (Yamaha Motor Corp., U.S.A.), Steve Menneto (Polaris Industries) and Kris Odwarka (BMW Motorrad USA). 

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, and activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers, distributors, dealers and retailers of motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, ROVs, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts, accessories and related goods and services, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at www.mic.org.

Motorcycle Industry Council at AMA Womens Conference

June 22, 2012 - The American Motorcyclist Association is pleased to announce that the Motorcycle Industry Council will be hosting a reception and luncheon for women in the motorcycling industry at the upcoming AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference in Carson City, Nevada in July. 

The event will take place on the opening day of the conference on Thursday, July 26, at noon in the Juniper Room at the Gold Dust West Hotel. 

"The Motorcycle Industry Council has been a wonderful advocate for women as motorcyclists in America, and we are very happy to have them join us at the conference and host this special tribute to the women in our industry," said AMA Marketing Manager Tigra Tsujikawa. 

"Women are such an important part of our industry, and we are proud to be a part of this conference," said MIC Vice President Cam Arnold. "This reception and luncheon will honor the women who have given so much of themselves to grow the motorcycling market and have played a significant role in increasing the number of women who are riding motorcycles today." 

Women who work in the powersports industry and who are registered to attend the AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference are invited to attend. To RSVP, or for more information about the reception and luncheon, please contact Cam Arnold at carnold@mic.org

The 2012 AMA International Women & Motorcycling Conference will take place in Carson City, Nev. July 26-29. Registration fees are $175 for AMA members and $235 for non-members through July 10. Non-members who join the AMA at a cost of $49 will still pay less than the "non-member" rate. Included in the fee are seminars, the marketplace and Moto Action Center, the Friday Night Cookout in Virginia City, the Saturday Night Celebration Party, and a Women's Health Fair where women can get a variety of health screenings such as mammograms and cholesterol and blood pressure checks. Registrants will also receive a conference t-shirt and gift bag. 

To register for the conference or see full conference details, as well as information about how to become an AMA member, visit www.womenandmotorcycling.com.

Watch for updates on the conference Facebook page at facebook.com/amawomenandmotorcycling.

 

About the American Motorcyclist Association
Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world's largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists' interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, the AMA honors the heroes and the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visitAmericanMotorcyclist.com.

In other words, Motorcycles and Scooters are awesome.

Well, DUH! We already knew that, didn't we folks?

Rep. Duncan Promotes Two-Wheeled Vehicles as Fun, Fuel-Efficient Choices for Many Americans 

Washington, D.C., May 23, 2012 – Congressional Motorcycle Safety Caucus Member and House Highways and Transit Subcommittee Chairman John Duncan (R-TN) entered a statement to the Congressional Record on May 18 recognizing motorcycles and scooters as viable transportation options for many Americans. Previously, President Obama had proclaimed May 15 through May 21 as National Transportation Week. In the proclamation, the President recognized that America needs a safer transportation network that will provide more transportation choices. 

“As a Member of the Congressional Motorcycle Safety Caucus, I would like to highlight one such choice and point out that two wheeled vehicles can be transportation options for many Americans,” said Chairman Duncan. “In his proclamation, the President called for increased transportation options that cut commuting time, ease traffic congestion, reduce oil consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Motorcycles and scooters are options that can help to meet all of these goals. Motorcycles and scooters also have the advantages of being much cheaper than cars or trucks as well as considerably easier to park - and a lot of fun to ride.”

“I own a scooter myself and I enjoy riding when I get the opportunity,” said Duncan. “I encourage all riders to get trained, licensed and obey traffic laws, and I remind all road users to be aware of motorcyclists, particularly as we move into the prime riding season in Tennessee and across the country.” 

“Motorcycles and scooters are fun for recreation, but can also be used for commuting and running errands,” said Kathy Van Kleeck, MIC’s senior vice president of government relations. “As Representative Duncan noted, they are highly fuel efficient and can be effective in easing congestion and meeting other important transportation goals. 

“MIC would like to thank Congressman Duncan for continuing to be a champion for motorcyclists and motorcycle safety in Congress,” said Duane Taylor, MIC’s director of federal affairs. 

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, and activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers and distributors of motorcycles, scooters, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts and accessories, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at www.mic.org.

Dual sport motorcycle and Scooter sales are up.

Motorcycle Industry Council Media Relations (949) 727-4211, ext. 3027

New MIC Business Advisory & Forecast Predicts 2012 Motorcycle and ATV Sales

Trade Association Makes First Ever Sales Projections

IRVINE, Calif., March 15, 2012 – The Motorcycle Industry Council forecasts modest declines in new motorcycle sales through 2012. That estimate comes from the MIC's new Business Advisory & Forecast, marking the first time that the industry association has projected future sales.

This MIC forecast, compiled in conjunction with the Institute for Trend Research, follows an initial estimate for 2011 sales showing some growth last year.

Collectively, the dozen leading brands included in the MIC's Retail Sales Report were up 0.3 percent in 2011, compared to the year before. Fuel-efficient models did especially well. Among these brands, scooter sales rose 11.8 percent and dual-purpose bike sales were up 14.2 percent. The MIC will announce first-quarter 2012 sales for these particular brands, which represent most of the market, on April 20.

"While our market stayed essentially flat last year, unemployment numbers and stagnant incomes are making consumers more cautious about large purchases," said MIC President Tim Buche. "Even with low interest rates making this a great time to buy for many people, overall economic uncertainty is leading us to predict we'll have fewer sales in 2012."

However, Buche said, the MIC forecast assumes the same amount of sales and marketing efforts on the part of manufacturers and distributors. They can influence and increase sales through production increases, through price changes, and things such as special promotions and captive financing programs.

The MIC Business Advisory & Forecast also projects that ATV sales will decline this year. But this trend is being offset by a market shift to recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs) that eclipsed 220,000 new unit sales in 2010, by some industry estimates. The MIC does not currently track ROV sales.

The forecast projects specific sales figures three years into the future, but this detail and long-range projection are only available to MIC members and are not for public distribution. Quarterly MIC news releases, with 2012 forecast updates, are scheduled for publication at the end of the months of April, July, and October.

While new bike sales remained virtually flat last year, there was positive news within other aspects of the industry. Spending on maintenance and repairs has been rising since April 2010, according to the business advisory, suggesting that the market for consumers taking care of bikes they’ve long owned, or improving used bikes they've recently purchased, could continue to improve.

Recent tire sales also reflect this trend, as well as data confirming that owners are putting more miles on their motorcycles. The MIC's Motorcycle Tire Sales Report shows that replacement tire purchases, among eight leading brands, rose 9.6 percent in 2011. Even off-highway tire sales increased by 11.7 percent last year, during the same time that sales of new off-highway motorcycles declined by more than 13 percent.

"We're seeing strong indications that riders are continuing to maintain their current motorcycles or upgrading ones they bought used, and we've recorded an increasing number of miles being ridden on American roads over the past decade," Buche said. "The interest in motorcycling is healthier than ever. That's good news for our industry over the long term and this bodes well for retailers."

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, business advisories and forecasts, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, and activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers and distributors of motorcycles, scooters, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts and accessories, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at www.mic.org.

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